Understanding your blood pressure for diabetes

Myth “You know if you have high blood pressure because it gives you headaches”

Truth High blood pressure does not always give you symptoms, and it is often found by chance during routine health checkups. Having your blood pressure checked at your annual diabetes reviews, and more frequently if your health professional suggest it, will be a more reliable indicator of whether your blood pressure is high.

My doctor tested me for Type 2 diabetes because I am having treatment for high blood pressure. Why is that?

Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure are both linked to insulin resistance, so if you have one of these conditions it is common to have the other, too. If you keep both your blood pressure and your blood glucose level under control, your chances of developing long-term complications, especially heart disease, are greatly reduced.

What is high blood pressure?

If your larger blood vessels become more rigid and your smaller blood vessels start to constrict, your blood has to flow through a narrower space than before. The result is greater pressure on your blood vessel walls, which is known as high blood pressure or, medically, as hypertension. Having high blood pressure is common when you have Type 2 diabetes.

I have high blood pressure but I don’t feel sick. Why does it need to be treated?

Having high blood pressure makes you much more prone to cardiovascular disease (CVD) – a serious condition that develops over many years as your blood vessels gradually become narrower and less flexible. You may have high blood pressure without knowing it and, if it remains untreated, you may develop angina (severe chest pain) or have a heart attack or a stroke. Taking your blood pressure treatment as prescribed and having regular checkups can help prevent these serious conditions.

What should my blood pressure be?

If you have Type 2 diabetes your blood pressure should be below 130/80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg). In some situations, for example if you have already developed kidney damage (nephropathy), you may need to keep your blood pressure lower, for example, 125/75 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) to prevent further damage. Discussing your ideal blood pressure level, and ways to achieve it, with your health professional will give you the level that is right for you.

Why are there two figures in my blood pressure measurement?

The top figure refers to the level of pressure in your blood vessels as your heart contracts and pumps blood around your body. This is known as the systolic blood pressure. The second figure is the lowest pressure as your heart relaxes between beats. This is known as the diastolic blood pressure.

What can I do to lower my blood pressure?

Stop smoking and lose weight if you need to, eating more fresh fruit and vegetables and less saturated fat and salt (for example, less processed or commercially prepared meals) to help reduce your blood pressure. Physical activity will also lower your blood pressure. Take any blood pressure pills that you have been prescribed, even if they do not affect the way you feel, to help keep your blood pressure in the recommended range.

How low can my blood pressure go?

It would be unusual for your blood pressure to be under 100/60 mmHg if you are otherwise healthy. For every 10 mmHg drop in your systolic blood pressure (the first figure) toward this level, you benefit by reducing your risk of heart attack or stroke.