AVOID THE TOP 10 BIGGEST BRAIN DAMAGING HABITS – Share this

According to world health organization following are such habits that will damage your brain severely:

1. No Breakfast – People who do not take breakfast are going to have a lower blood sugar… level. This leads to an insufficient supply of nutrients to the brain causing brain degeneration.

2. Overreacting – It causes hardening of the brain arteries, leading to a decrease in mental power.

3. Smoking – It causes multiple brain shrinkage and may lead to Alzheimer disease.

4. High Sugar consumption – Too much sugar will interrupt the absorption of proteins and nutrients causing malnutrition and may interfere with brain development.

5. Air Pollution – The brain is the largest oxygen consumer in our body. Inhaling polluted air decreases the supply of oxygen to the brain, bringing about a decrease in brain efficiency.

6. Sleep Deprivation – Sleep allows our brain to rest. Long term deprivation from sleep will accelerate the death of brain cells.

7. Head covered while sleeping – Sleeping with the head covered increases the concentration of carbon dioxide and decrease concentration of oxygen that may lead to brain damaging effects.

8. Working your brain during illness – Working hard or studying with sickness may lead to a decrease in effectiveness of the brain.

9. Lacking in stimulating thoughts – Thinking is the best way to train our brain, lacking in brain stimulation thoughts may cause brain shrinkage.

10. Talking Rarely – Intellectual conversations will promote the efficiency of the brain.

Please pay caution and try to avoid such situations!! Share this !!See More
AVOID THE TOP 10 BIGGEST BRAIN DAMAGING HABITS

According to world health organization following are such habits that will damage your brain severely:

1. No Breakfast – People who do not take breakfast are going to have a lower blood sugar… level. This leads to an insufficient supply of nutrients to the brain causing brain degeneration.

2. Overreacting – It causes hardening of the brain arteries, leading to a decrease in mental power.

3. Smoking – It causes multiple brain shrinkage and may lead to Alzheimer disease.

4. High Sugar consumption – Too much sugar will interrupt the absorption of proteins and nutrients causing malnutrition and may interfere with brain development.

5. Air Pollution – The brain is the largest oxygen consumer in our body. Inhaling polluted air decreases the supply of oxygen to the brain, bringing about a decrease in brain efficiency.

6. Sleep Deprivation – Sleep allows our brain to rest. Long term deprivation from sleep will accelerate the death of brain cells.

7. Head covered while sleeping – Sleeping with the head covered increases the concentration of carbon dioxide and decrease concentration of oxygen that may lead to brain damaging effects.

8. Working your brain during illness – Working hard or studying with sickness may lead to a decrease in effectiveness of the brain.

9. Lacking in stimulating thoughts – Thinking is the best way to train our brain, lacking in brain stimulation thoughts may cause brain shrinkage.

10. Talking Rarely – Intellectual conversations will promote the efficiency of the brain.

Please pay caution and try to avoid such situations!! Share this !!

Doubling Up Against Strokes

Headache, confusion, sudden loss of vision, dizziness — these are the symptoms of a stroke that can come at any moment, and getting help fast is crucial to a stroke victim’s recovery. Now a new approach to treating stroke may improve the odds of a successful recovery.

Nick and his wife, Marie, live in Jacksonville, Fla., and have shared a lot of good times.

“There was a time we used to go dancing four or five times a week,” says Nick.

Marie agrees. “You know, we can’t complain. I mean we’ve been to a lot of great places.”

They have also had their share of worries. Nick has had a major heart attack, a viral infection, cataracts, kidney disease and two strokes.

“I don’t know how I’m here, still here,” says Nick.

When Nick had his last stroke, he was given the drug, tPA intravenously, to break up the stroke-causing clot.

“That’s the clot-busting enzyme that’s produced in the lining cells of all blood vessels,” says a neurologist.

Although it worked for Nick, Dr. says less than 30 percent of patients who receive it significantly benefit. Now a new delivery method, called intra-arterial, or IA, may double that recovery rate. It involves threading a catheter to the brain where the stroke occurred.

“The advantage of the IV is speed,” says Dr., “The advantage of the IA is that you can put the medicine right next to the blood clot.”

Doctors are testing whether combining the two delivery methods can improve those odds.

“So that you get the advantage of quick starting the treatment but also maximizing the likelihood of opening up the blood vessel,” says Dr. Meschia.

Nick has slowed down some but says he’s in good hands with Marie. “She’s my rock of Gibraltar,” he says.

Dr. say there is a risk of hemorrhage associated with combining the two methods, but preliminary results show the combination is leading to better outcomes even after that risk is factored in.

Arsenic Linked to Atherosclerosis

A new study reveals long-term ingestion of inorganic arsenic, a contaminant often found in some well water, may be linked to heart attacks, strokes and diseased arteries.

For the first time, researchers report a strong dose-dependent relationship between arsenic exposure and accelerated development of arterial diseases throughout the body.

Researchers from the National Taiwan University observed more than 460 adult residents from a southwestern area of Taiwan known for its high prevalence of inorganic arsenic in well water.

Participants in the study were interviewed about dietary habits, personal and exercise habits, smoking and alcohol intake and water consumption history. They also underwent regular health examinations to determine cholesterol levels and plaque build up in their carotid arteries, or the arteries that lead to the brain.

Researchers gathered information to calculate how long subjects had consumed the well water, the average arsenic concentration in the water, and cumulative arsenic exposure.

Researchers found the prevalence of arterial disease increased as the amount of arsenic exposure increased. The group with the highest arsenic exposure had three times the risk of arterial disease compared to those who were not exposed to arsenic. Those in the mid-range group of exposure were twice as likely to develop disease as those not exposed.

Researchers of the study write, “From the strong dose-dependent relationship, we conclude that long-term arsenic exposure is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis [disease of the arteries] and that carotid atherosclerosis is a novel marker for arseniasis.” The impact of this and other research has led to the regulation of arsenic levels in many areas. For example, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant level for arsenic in drinking water has been lowered from 50 to 10 micrograms per liter.

Act FAST

Early detection and treatment can help a stroke victim survive and decrease the severity of long-term damage. Learn the symptoms of stroke by memorizing a simple acronym: FAST…

F is for facial numbness, especially on one side. Can the person smile? Observe whether either side of the face or mouth droops.

A is for arm numbness and/or weakness, especially on one side. Ask the person to raise their arms above their head. Does one arm drift downward or can’t go up all the way?

S is for speech difficulties. Have them repeat a simple sentence. Can they do it? Is their speech slurred?

T is for time, which is critical. If the person shows any of these basic symptoms, call 911 immediately.

Those at increased risk for stroke include people over 55, men, African-Americans, and those with a family history. But don’t assume someone can’t be having a stroke simply because they’re young or seemingly healthy. Anyone can have a stroke — so act FAST if you spot any of the telltale signs.

Common Drugs Linked to Stroke

Patients taking drugs such as antidepressants or migraine pills to enhance serotonin production may be at increased risk for stroke, say researchers.

In the issue of Neurology, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital report on three cases of patients who developed a condition known as Call-Fleming syndrome. Call-Fleming syndrome is characterized by seizures, neurologic deficits, severe headaches that come on suddenly, and reversible vasoconstriction (blood vessel constriction). Researchers say the only cause determined for the constriction of the blood vessels was recent exposure to serotonin-enhancing drugs.

Serotonin-enhancing drugs can include antidepressants, migraine medication, decongestants, diet pills, amphetamines and the club drug known as “ecstasy.” From this study, researchers say these types of drugs can bring on sudden, severe headaches, seizures and stroke. They say there is particular concern when these drugs are combined with other vasoactive drugs.

Researchers say the study has implications for the treatment of patients who complain of any of the mentioned symptoms, especially sudden-onset headaches. SOURCE: Neurology, 2002;58:130-133

Migraines and Stroke Risk in Men

A new study shows chronic headache is a predictor of stroke in men. Interestingly, the study did not find a connection between headaches and stroke risk in women.

There have been many studies linking migraines and the risk of stroke. Most studies link the risk of stroke and migraines among premenopausal women. Doctors from the National Public Health Institute in Helsinki, Finland, conducted a study to determine the connection between migraines and stroke risk.

The study included 35,056 Finnish men and women between ages 25 and 64. The men and women were part of a cardiovascular risk survey that was conducted in 1972, 1977, 1982 and 1987. The participants were asked about headaches, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, weight, height, cholesterol level, and oral contraceptive use. During the study, 2,167 of the participants suffered a stroke.

Researchers say women in the study reported having headaches twice as often as men. When investigators compared who had headaches and a stroke, they found there was an association with men, but not with women in the study. The association was stronger in the first year of follow-up and decreased as years passed among men. With the women, there was an association between headache and stroke risk but it was not statistically significant.

Authors of the study conclude chronic headache is an independent predictor of stroke among men. Since the association was stronger during a short follow-up, researchers say migraines could be a marker of the process that leads to an acute stroke.

SOURCE: Archives of Internal Medicine, 2003;163:1058-1062